San Marino Island

San Marino Island Highlights:
  • Population 286 (2010)
  • One of the original Venetian Islands completed in the Miami Beach project
  • San Marino Island is the third island from the left, situated closer to Greater Miami than Miami Beach
  • Despite its position, San Marino Island is a part of the Miami Beach community
  • Luxurious waterfront residences are home to numerous celebrities who wish to remain anonymous

As one of the original, planned Venetian Islands completed in the early 20th century, San Marino Island has a unique distinction among US coastal islands. It is completely man-made and the result of a project co-founded by John S. Collins, a local farmer and real estate investor, and Carl G. Fisher, a racing pioneer and investment partner. Located in beautiful Biscayne Bay, San Marino Island is located within minutes of Miami Beach’s City Center as well as mainland Miami.

Since its creation, San Marino Island has been home to several local, regional, national, and even international celebrities, who frequent the area for its beautiful views, luxury homes, and astoundingly relaxed beachside atmosphere. Unlike many mainland homes, however, San Marino’s beachfront and inland homes are all located well within the lush, tropical greenery the islands are known for. Though strictly residential, San Marino has access to Miami Beach and Miami Proper’s numerous cultural, dining, and shopping experiences via the Venetian Causeway.

Did You Know?
  • San Marino Island is the westernmost of the three central Venetian Islands, all of which take on an elongated appearance and form the well-known nearly circular outline recognizable from the air.
  • San Marino Island was only accessible from Miami and Miami Beach by ferry until 1913. At that time, the Collins Bridge – the longest wooden bridge in the world upon its construction – was completed, linking the island to Miami Beach.
  • After the Miami Hurricane of 1926, the Collins Bridge and original causeway was replaced by the Venetian Causeway, speeding access to Miami Beach and the mainland. This causeway remains today and links each of the Venetian Islands.
  • San Marino Island and its Venetian Island counterparts are considered a popular suburb-like extension of both the Greater Miami and Miami Beach communities. The islands and the affiliated causeway are popular for walking, jogging, and sightseeing.
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